Posts Tagged ‘ Tony Evans ’

Do with passion or not at all.

‘People inspire you, or they drain you. PICK THEM WISELY.’

Hans F. Hasen — ‘People inspire you, or they drain you. PICK THEM WISELY.’

Why The First Step To Succeeding In Anything Is Saying ‘Yes’

Read this and thought it was interesting , but funnily enough I just watched ‘Yes Man ‘ and it was the same kind of concept . Worth a try for some individuals .

Why The First Step To Succeeding In Anything Is Saying ‘Yes’


Money
Paul HudsonJan 18, 2014 – 1:36pm

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Every mark of success originates in the same way: answering a question with “yes.” We are presented with opportunities every single day. Whether or not we choose to accept those opportunities and act upon them is a different story. Most people will complain that they never get a break, that things never just fall into their lap, like they seem to for everyone else.

The thing is, nothing just “falls” into anyone’s lap. In order to encounter an opportunity, you must seek it out. There are two steps to attracting opportunities: The first step is to find and recognize an opportunity when one presents itself, and the second is to say “yes.” If you don’t say yes and take proactive action, you’ll never get anywhere in life.

Opportunities come in the form of persons. It’s not like your dream job will come knocking on your door; dreams don’t have fists. Only people can present you with opportunities. For this reason, we have to maximize the efficiency of our interactions with other people. You will need to meet new people because new people are much more likely to present you with opportunities than the people you come across on a regular basis.

Sure, the people you know may present you with opportunities from time to time, but the fastest way to stumble upon fresh opportunity is to expand your network. Before you go out and start introducing yourself to every person you meet — which may actually be quite fun — I recommend talking to the right people.

What makes someone the right person to approach depends on the type of opportunity you are looking for. If you are looking for a job in a certain field — say, the medical field — then you’d be best off going to places and events where you can mingle with doctors.

If you are looking for a relationship, go to places where you are most likely to find single people also looking to be in a relationship — Google it and you’ll find more than enough places to meet your future husband. Go to places that focus on the things you enjoy, like museums, bookstores, clothing stores, the park…

You are most likely to land the right opportunity going to places where you’re most likely to find good opportunities. Why do you think people go to Ivy League schools? It’s not for the education; it’s for the networking.

Recognizing an opportunity is not as simple as it sounds, unfortunately. It can be very difficult to figure out what is a great chance to make progress in your life or career and what is most likely a waste of time. It’s impossible to know what the future holds in any given circumstance, so trying to recognize an opportunity for what it is near impossible. The only thing you can do is give it your best guess. If you think something may lead to a great opportunity, then take the leap of faith and go after it. In order to do this, you have to do what many people find to be the most difficult step in finding opportunity: saying yes.

Opportunities aren’t so much found as they are created. You create the possibility for opportunity every time you say yes to a request. For example, I landed my job with Elite Daily because I said yes to a friend of mine when he asked me to go out for drinks. I ended up meeting a certain Mr. Cuffin, and then, a week later, I’m at the Elite Daily headquarters.

One year later and I’ve written several articles that have received hundreds of thousands of shares. Because I was given the opportunity to work with Elite, I was also able to introduce myself to the right people.

Now, I’m launching my own startup: lilHub. All of this opportunity presented itself and led to my success, only because I said yes. I said yes to something that did not present itself as an opportunity, at all; it was just a fun night out. If it weren’t for that one “yes,” you wouldn’t be reading this article and I wouldn’t be living my dream. I’ll be honest with you, my initial response was to say no and stay home; I needed a little convincing.

We will often say no instead of yes as a result of our fears or our laziness. No, we don’t want to go out because we’re too tired. No, we don’t want to quit our jobs and start our own company because we’re afraid we’ll fail. No, we don’t want to see her again because we’re not very good with commitment and she seems like a girl that we may end up falling for. It’s illogical. Of course, sometimes it is better to say no. Unfortunately, there’s no way of knowing until after the fact.

My advice is to say yes as often as you can in order to maximize the possibility of a great opportunity presenting itself. Only say no when you truly believe you will be better off saying no. You may not be right, but we literally can’t say yes to everything because we’ll spread ourselves too thin.

sometimes you win sometimes you learn

‘sometimes you win sometimes you learn’

a negative mind will never give you a positive life

a negative mind will never give you a positive life .

And before I get this comment agaian , a negetive times a negetive doesn’t give a postive !

Eliminate These 8 Things From Your Daily Routine

Eliminate These 8 Things From Your Daily Routine


If you get decent value from making to-do lists, you’ll get huge returns — in productivity, in improved relationships, and in your personal well-being — from adding these items to your not to-do list:

Every day, make the commitment not to:

1. Check my phone while I’m talking to someone.

You’ve done it. You’ve played the, “Is that your phone? Oh, it must be mine,” game. You’ve tried the you-think-sly-but-actually-really-obvious downwards glance. You’ve done the, “Wait, let me answer this text…” thing.

Maybe you didn’t even say, “Wait.” You just stopped talking, stopped paying attention, and did it.

Want to stand out? Want to be that person everyone loves because they make you feel, when they’re talking to you, like you’re the most important person in the world?

Stop checking your phone. It doesn’t notice when you aren’t paying attention.

Other people? They notice.

And they care.

2. Multitask during a meeting.

The easiest way to be the smartest person in the room is to be the person who pays the most attention to the room.

You’ll be amazed by what you can learn, both about the topic of the meeting and about the people in the meeting if you stop multitasking and start paying close attention. You’ll flush out and understand hidden agendas, you’ll spot opportunities to build bridges, and you’ll find ways to make yourself indispensable to the people who matter.

It’s easy, because you’ll be the only one trying.

And you’ll be the only one succeeding on multiple levels.

3. Think about people who don’t make any difference in my life.

Trust me: The inhabitants of planet Kardashian are okay without you.

But your family, your friends, your employees–all the people that really matter to you–are not. Give them your time and attention.

They’re the ones who deserve it.

4. Use multiple notifications.

You don’t need to know the instant you get an email. Or a text. Or a tweet. Or anything else that pops up on your phone or computer.

If something is important enough for you to do, it’s important enough for you to do without interruptions. Focus totally on what you’re doing. Then, on a schedule you set–instead of a schedule you let everyone else set–play prairie dog and pop your head upto see what’s happening.

And then get right back to work. Focusing on what you are doing is a lot more important than focusing on other people might be doing.

They can wait. You, and what is truly important to you, cannot.

5. Let the past dictate the future.

Mistakes are valuable. Learn from them.

Then let them go.

Easier said than done? It all depends on your perspective. When something goes wrong, turn it into an opportunity to learn something you didn’t know–especially about yourself.

When something goes wrong for someone else, turn it into an opportunity to be gracious, forgiving, and understanding.

The past is just training. The past should definitely inform but in no way define you —unless you let it.

6. Wait until I’m sure I will succeed.

You can never feel sure you will succeed at something new, but you can always feel sure you are committed to giving something your best.

And you can always feel sure you will try again if you fail.

Stop waiting. You have a lot less to lose than you think, and everything to gain.

7. Talk behind someone’s back.

If only because being the focus of gossip sucks. (And so do the people who gossip.)

If you’ve talked to more than one person about something Joe is doing, wouldn’t everyone be better off if you stepped up and actually talked to Joe about it? And if it’s “not your place” to talk to Joe, it’s probably not your place to talk about Joe.

Spend your time on productive conversations. You’ll get a lot more done–and you’ll gain a lot more respect.

8. Say “yes” when I really mean “no.”

Refusing a request from colleagues, customers, or even friends is really hard. But rarely does saying no go as badly as you expect. Most people will understand, and if they don’t, should you care too much about what they think?

When you say no, at least you’ll only feel bad for a few moments. When you say yes to something you really don’t want to do you might feel bad for a long time — or at least as long as it takes you to do what you didn’t want to do in the first place.

Read more: http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/8-things-you-should-not-do-every-day.html?nav=pop#ixzz2r2VSnYFD

“No matter how you feel, get up, dress up and show up.”

“No matter how you feel, get up, dress up and show up.”

Nice !

19 Hard Things You Need To Do To Be Successful

19 Hard Things You Need To Do To Be Successful


You have to do the hard things. 

  • You have to make the call you’re afraid to make.
  • You have to get up earlier than you want to get up.
  • You have to give more than you get in return right away.
  • You have to care more about others than they care about you.
  • You have to fight when you are already injured, bloody, and sore.
  • You have to feel unsure and insecure when playing it safe seems smarter.
  • You have to lead when no one else is following you yet.
  • You have to invest in yourself even though no one else is.
  • You have to look like a fool while you’re looking for answers you don’t have.
  • You have to grind out the details when it’s easier to shrug them off.
  • You have to deliver results when making excuses is an option.
  • You have to search for your own explanations even when you’re told to accept the “facts.”
  • You have to make mistakes and look like an idiot.
  • You have to try and fail and try again.
  • You have to run faster even though you’re out of breath.
  • You have to be kind to people who have been cruel to you.
  • You have to meet deadlines that are unreasonable and deliver results that are unparalleled.
  • You have to be accountable for your actions even when things go wrong.
  • You have to keep moving towards where you want to be no matter what’s in front of you.

Read full article on here

Be strong you never know who you are inspiring

be strong you never know who you are inspiring

Interesting point of view .

Why You Need To Cut Ties: If Your Friendships Aren’t Benefitting You, They’re Holding You Back

Interesting article , thought I would share .

Why You Need To Cut Ties: If Your Friendships Aren’t Benefitting You, They’re Holding You Back


Wellness
Paul HudsonJan 13, 2014 – 3:15pm

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Relationships are essential to leading a happy life. In fact, one could make the argument that all that matters in life is our interaction with each other. Human interaction is necessary; our minds feed off it in order to function properly. In a sense, interaction is what makes us human; healthy, strong relationships teach us to be compassionate and to value life. For this reason, it is crucial we only allow ourselves to engage in good relationships, avoiding negative ones.

However, there is always more we can do to profit from our lives and our relationships. We can focus our energy only on beneficial relationships. Good relationships can be beneficial, but that isn’t always the case. Sometimes, what we consider a good relationship would be better referred to as a relationship that isn’t bad: It’s not exactly good, but it’s not bad, so it’s good by default. The majority of us have at least one or two of these “not bad” relationships. While it may not seem like a big deal to entertain such relationships, it is.

Those who are most present in our lives become significant in our lives, whether we wish for it or not. By simply being present and by our awareness of their presence, these people become a part of our lives, part of us. The brain doesn’t so much forget as it does misfile; all the people that you’ve ever met, those you’ve even just noticed, are floating around in that head of yours, affecting your thoughts in one way or another — at least on some occasions.

You won’t notice this, of course, but our memories become points on an intricate web of memories, which connects to full thoughts and later to actions. The more present a person is in our life, the more we interact with him or her, and the more we tend to think about this person. The more we think about him or her, the more he or she influences every other thought that goes on in our heads.

Of course, who’s to say that some poor, or even terrible, relationships don’t lead to great ideas and amazing results? However, seeing as positive relationships lead to a happier you, and since a happier you is a more efficient you, it would be wise to stick with beneficial relationships.

Beneficial relationships come in many shapes and sizes, but what it comes down to is whether or not the total benefit of each relationship has a positive or negative effect on your life. It’s simple math. Take out a piece of paper and list all the perks of being in any given relationship, as well as all the ways you are worse off because of the relationship.

If the difference is positive, the relationship may be worth keeping. The values you assign to each benefit and negative impact are completely up to you. It really depends on what you value the most. For some, relationships are completely about honesty and support; for other’s, it’s all about access to a rooftop pool and a 72-inch TV on game day.

Next, you can’t forget to adjust for the tradeoffs. There is only so much time in a day, and socializing takes up a lot of time. The busier you are with other things, the less time you have to spend on friends and lovers. If we wish to have the best lives we can possibly have, then we have no choice but to prioritize our relationships.

When it comes down to it, for every relationship you have, you are technically giving up the time that could have been occupied by another social interaction, another relationship. This is the tradeoff. Statistically speaking, you’ll be happier if you keep your “close” relationships to about five.

Once you start hitting double digits, each relationship you have begins to suffer because you simply don’t have enough time to maintain them. That’s something I should have mentioned earlier: Relationships require maintenance. But you already knew that.

Deciding which relationships you should keep requires some calculation and deep thought. Usually, relationships don’t need to be cut off entirely. It’s really more about spending time on the relationships that count and, most importantly, decapitating those that are destructive. Unfortunately, this is usually easier said than done.

Even more difficult than ending friendships is cutting off romantic relationships. Usually, the more poisonous these relationships are, the more we try to hang on to them and convince ourselves that they’re actually good for us. Getting your life together takes courage; no one is saying otherwise. It really comes down to how badly you want to reach your full potential, and how happy you’ll be getting there.

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